Education Library Blog

Stay up to date on news, events and special features.

Collection Spotlight: Science Literacy Week 2019

Science Literacy Week (September 16-22, 2019) is an annual celebration of science in Canada, in which libraries, universities, museums and other partners offer events and displays to highlight research and learning at our institutions.

Featured New Arrivals: September 2019

Click on the book cover to take you to the UBC Library catalogue record for the item.

An educator’s guide to STEAM: engaging students using real-world problems / Cassie F. Quigley, Danielle Herro

LB1585 .Q54 2019

The children you teach: using a developmental framework in the classroom / Susan Engel.

LB1115 .E495 2018

 

Inspiring writing in primary schools / Liz Chamberlain

LB1576 .C41825 2019

Modelling exciting writing: a guide for primary teaching / Adam Bushnell, Rob Smith, David Waugh.

LB1576 .B953 2019

 

Books on mindfulness and meditation at UBC Education Library

With Canadian Bianca Andreescu’s amazing U.S. Open win on Saturday, people are talking about Andreescu’s use of visualization, mindfulness and meditation and how it might have contributed to her success. Andreescu credited her meditation practice to helping pave the way to her historic victory.

Learn more about mindfulness and meditation. You never know where it might take you… [photo credit: sportsnet.ca]

Meditation also ties into social-emotional learning and self-regulation which are both important components of the personal awareness and responsibility strand of the BC Core Competencies.

Below you will find just a small selection of UBC Education Library books on mindfulness and meditation to help you get started on your journey!

Click on the title or book cover to take you to the item in our catalogue.

Mindfulness on the run: quick, effective mindfulness techniques for busy people
by Hofstee, Chantal
Provides strategies for applying mindfulness techniques in everyday life, with the goal of reducing stress and maintaining a sense of peace and calm.
BF637.P3 H64 2016, EDUCATION LIBRARY stacks

Mindfulness for students
by Cottrell, Stella
Using a unique combination of mindfulness-based techniques and study skills, this book shows students how to apply mindfulness to their studies and everyday life in simple, practical steps.
LB1065 .C68 2018, EDUCATION LIBRARY stacks

The mindfulness teaching guide: essential skills & competencies for teaching mindfulness-based interventions
by Brandsma, Rob
You must embody mindfulness in order to teach it. The Mindfulness Teaching Guide offers a thorough and practical guide for mindfulness teachers and professionals, offering a systematic approach to developing the teaching methods, skills, and competencies needed to become a proficient mindfulness teacher.
BF321 .B735 2017, EDUCATION LIBRARY stacks

Zen teacher: creating focus, simplicity and tranquillity in the classroom
by Tricarico, Dan
In The Zen Teacher, educator, blogger, and speaker Dan Tricarico provides practical, easy-to-use techniques to help teachers slow down and create a sense of focus, simplicity, and tranquillity in the classroom – and in life.
LB2840 .T75 2015, EDUCATION LIBRARY Great Reads

For Children:

I am peace: a book of mindfulness
by Verde, Susan; Reynolds, Peter H
Perfect for the classroom or for bedtime, Susan Verde’s gentle, concrete narration and Peter H. Reynolds’s expressive watercolour illustrations bring the tenets of mindfulness to a kid-friendly level. Featuring an author’s note about the importance of mindfulness and a guided meditation for children, I Am Peace will help readers of all ages feel grounded and restored.
PZ7.1.V46 Im 2017, EDUCATION LIBRARY CCBC

Meditation is an open sky: mindfulness for kids
by Stewart, Whitney; Rippin, Sally
Feeling mindful is feeling good! You know when you’re having a bad day, you have that wobbly feeling inside and nothing seems to go right? Find a quiet place, sit down, and meditate! In this daily companion, kids of any age will learn simple exercises to help manage stress and emotions, find focus, and face challenges. Simple, secular, and mainstream, this mindfulness book is an excellent tool for helping kids deal with the stresses of everyday life.
BF723.M37 S74 2015, EDUCATION LIBRARY stacks

 

Critical Literacy and Selecting Indigenous Literature

The Education Library collection includes resources that support a number of activities, including educational research and teaching–both in the Faculty of Education and in K-12 schools. On our shelves, you will find picture books and curriculum items alongside scholarly works. Our hope is that you approach and evaluate all materials in our collection, and those you encounter in other libraries and classrooms, with a critically literate disposition.

 

What is Critical Literacy?

McNicol (2016) describes critical literacy in the following way: “critical literacy is concerned with the social and cultural contexts in which texts (including not simply written texts, but digital texts, multimedia, visual materials and so forth) are both created and read….The approach taken in critical literacy is not to read texts in isolation, but to develop an understanding of the cultural, ideological and sociolinguistic contexts in which they are created and read” (p. xi). Critical literacy requires us to go beyond what we read on the page to consider the larger narrative in which a text is situated, asking questions about who created a text and why.

Watch educator Dr. Allen Luke further discuss critical literacy, and the role of teaching in developing a critically literate approach to texts, in the following video:

The Learning Exchange. (2018). Allen Luke: Critical literacy.
Retrieved from https://thelearningexchange.ca/videos/allan-luke-critical-literacy-2/
Note that closed captions are available.

 

Indigenous Materials in the Education Library

The texts by and about Indigenous peoples in the Library collection have been added to our shelves (both physical and virtual) over the course of decades and, together, offer multiple representations of Indigenous peoples. In some cases, those representations are inauthentic, problematic, and inaccurate. Those materials remain in the collection to support current and future research but may be unsuitable for use in K-12 schools, at least without properly contextualizing and carefully considering the purpose behind their use. We encourage teacher candidates to apply a critically literate approach to selecting materials from the Library to support their teaching about Indigenous peoples, perspectives, and principles of learning, seeking authenticity in the texts they choose.

According to the First Nations Education Steering Committee (2016), authentic texts are “historical or contemporary texts that:

  • present authentic First Peoples voices (i.e., are created by First Peoples or through the substantial contributions of First Peoples);
  • depict themes and issues that are important within First Peoples cultures…;
  • incorporate First Peoples story-telling techniques and features as applicable….” (“What are Authentic First Peoples Texts?”)

To get a sense of the varying representations of Indigenous peoples found in our collection, have a look at some of the problematic titles we’ve pulled for the display. Then, compare them with the authentic alternatives. What differences do you see?

 

References

McNicol, S. (2016). Critical literacy for information professionals. Retrieved from http://tinyurl.com/yyoaoxoz

The Learning Exchange. (2018). Allen Luke: Critical literacy. Retrieved from https://thelearningexchange.ca/videos/allan-luke-critical-literacy-2/

First Nations Education Steering Committee. (2016). Authentic First Peoples resources k-9. Retrieved from http://www.fnesc.ca/wp/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/PUBLICATION-61502-updated-FNESC-Authentic-Resources-Guide-October-2016.pdf

September Display and Workshops: How do library services and resources support the development of multiple literacies?

Our new major book display is up just in time for the start of the new academic year!  The theme is “how do library services and resources support the development of multiple literacies?”
Browse this display on the main level of the library just outside the Young Learners Library.

The display is designed to complement the Unlock Library Literacy workshops that each teacher education student will participate in as part of LLED 350 or LLED 360 during September. Students will actively explore a selection of library resources and get to know the Education Library at the same time. Exploration stations are focused on themes of Indigenous perspectives and critical literacy, differentiated reading materials, leisure reading, coding and computational thinking resources, and “making” stories through unplugged STEAM activities.

The following essential questions are our guides for exploration: 

What role does the library play in literacy education? How do library services and resources support the development of multiple literacies?

The Unlock Library Literacy workshops model a gamified approach to learning design. Research indicates that gamification of education can improve learning outcomes, engagement and motivation, self-efficacy, and knowledge retention (Rabah, Cassidy, & Beauchemin, 2018). During the workshops, students will receive a series of numbers after completing each station, which can be used to unlock a box and get a surprise.

Reference:

Rabah, J., Cassidy, R., & Beauchemin, R. (2018, November). Gamification in Education: Real Benefits or Edutainment?. In European Conference on e-Learning (pp. 489-XIX). Academic Conferences International Limited.